What is public domain?

The public domain refers to material that was once protected by copyright law but that now can be used and exploited by anyone and everyone without authorization, and without the obligation to pay fees or enter into license agreements for use. Public domain material is no longer protected by copyright due to the expiry of the term of protection, or if the conditions of protection are no longer fulfilled. The nature of the public domain is under active discussion. The role of the public domain is critical to Indigenous, traditional and local communities because particular expressions are either not protected by current copyright laws, or have been ‘authored’ by non-Indigenous people and due to the time-period have fallen into the public domain. To the extent that Native, First Nations, Aboriginal and Indigenous knowledge is in the public domain, this means that it may be freely used by artists, writers, researchers, industry and/or any other user. Native, First Nations, Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples and communities contest the conditions that allow their cultural expressions, knowledge systems and cultural heritage to be in the public domain.

We recognize that the public domain status of cultural heritage material poses special problems for Native, First Nations, Aboriginal and Indigenous communities and we have developed the TK Labels specifically to try and deal with the continued lack of control. In this sense the TK Labels are a tool for providing relevant cultural information for this public domain material. We believe that if people have more information through the TK Labels, this will change how Indigenous public domain material will be used and circulated, and how communities can be contacted, involved and engaged as the rightful and ongoing custodians of their cultural heritage. We believe that the TK Labels will help external users make better and more informed decisions about how, when and if it is appropriate to use Native, First Nations, Aboriginal and Indigenous cultural heritage. Labeling helps uninformed publics make different decisions and therefore adds capacity to act and behave more ethically, fairly and equitably towards Native, First Nations, Aboriginal and Indigenous peoples and their cultural heritage.

How will TK tools benefit our community?

How will TK tools benefit our community?

How long does it take to develop TK Labels?

How long does it take to develop TK Labels?

Do I need permission to use the TK Licenses?

Do I need permission to use the TK Licenses?

National Library of Australia IP Guidelines

National Library of Australia IP Guidelines

Intellectual Property Consult Agreement

Mozilla TK Label Interview

Mozilla TK Label Interview

How do we implement TK Labels in our collection?

How do we implement TK Labels in our collection?

Our community wants to develop TK Labels. What’s next?

Our community wants to develop TK Labels. What’s next?

Minnesota Historical Society NAGPRA Policy

Minnesota Historical Society NAGPRA Policy

Protocols for Native American Archival Materials

Protocols for Native American Archival Materials

What is Mukurtu and how can I use it for my collection?

What is Mukurtu and how can I use it for my collection?

MOU between the Penobscot Nation and the University of Maine

MOU between the Penobscot Nation and the University of Maine

Musqueam Indian Band and University of British Columbia MOA

Musqueam Indian Band and University of British Columbia MOA

Think Before You Appropriate Guide

Think Before You Appropriate Guide

First Nations Research Policy

First Nations Research Policy

Alternative Model of Curation Workflow

Alternative Model of Curation Workflow

How does the TK Label Adapter work?

How does the TK Label Adapter work?

Does our community need to know where our collections are before labeling?

Does our community need to know where our collections are before labeling?

What does this cost?

What does this cost?

Do I need special software?

Do I need special software?

Does it work with Mukurtu CMS?

Does it work with Mukurtu CMS?

How does this work in our CMS?

How does this work in our CMS?

What is a protocol?

What is a protocol?

Who is a TK Holder?

Who is a TK Holder?

What is a TK Label?

What is a TK Label?

Who are the TK Labels for?

Who are the TK Labels for?

Does labeling change anything legally?

Does labeling change anything legally?

Are TK Labels legally binding?

Are TK Labels legally binding?

Templates Coming Soon

Templates Coming Soon

What does labeling do?

What does labeling do?

Do we need to own material that we want to label?

Do we need to own material that we want to label?

Can we customize the TK Labels according to our community needs?

Can we customize the TK Labels according to our community needs?

Can we customize the TK Labels according to our institution needs?

Can we customize the TK Labels according to our institution needs?

What is Intellectual Property?

What is Intellectual Property?

What is copyright?

What is copyright?

What is a copyright holder?

What is a copyright holder?

How long does copyright last?

How long does copyright last?

What if a work was made in the US but is held in an overseas institution?

What if a work was made in the US but is held in an overseas institution?

What is public domain?

What is public domain?

What is ‘in perpetuity’?

What is ‘in perpetuity’?

What is Traditional Knowledge (TK)?

What is Traditional Knowledge (TK)?

What is the TK Label Adapter?

What is the TK Label Adapter?

What is a Memorandum of Understanding or Memorandum of Agreement?

What is a Memorandum of Understanding or Memorandum of Agreement?

Who is a TK User?

Who is a TK User?

TK Attribution (TK A)

TK Attribution (TK A)