TK Notices

The Notices are specific tools for institutions and researchers which support the recognition of Indigenous interests in collections and data. There are four Notices: the TK (Traditional Knowledge) Notice and the BC (Biocultural) Notice align to the TK and BC Labels.  There are two CI (Cultural Institution) Notices; the Attribution Incomplete Notice and the Open to Collaboration Notice.  The Notices are a mechanism for researchers and institutional staff to identify Indigenous collections and Indigenous interests in data.  The Notices can function as place-holders on collections, data, or in a sample field until a TK or a BC Label is added by a community. To use TK & BC Notices, you will need to register with the Local Contexts Hub which will generate your Notice, connect project metadata to it, and send a notification about the use to the relevant community. To register for the Local Contexts Hub, click here.

Click on a Notice below to learn more about its usage.

Questions?

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A TK NOTICE AND A BC NOTICE?

The TK Notice recognizes that traditional knowledge contributed to the identification or collection of samples or data. The traditional knowledge may or may not be a part of the collection but future users should be aware that there are indigenous rights derived from traditional knowledge associated with the collection.  

The BC Notice recognizes that Indigenous rights and interests are associated with the collection, sample or new data because samples and data were collected from Indigenous lands and/or waters.

CAN THE TK AND THE BC NOTICE BE USED TOGETHER?

Yes. The TK and the BC Notice were designed so that they could be used separately and/or together.

CAN A TK or BC NOTICE BE ADDED WITHOUT COMMUNITY APPROVAL?

Yes. The Notices work to activate researcher and institutional responsibility to identify potential Indigenous rights and interests. Decolonial research methodologies insist that Indigenous interests should be addressed and included in any research at the first instance. This means that Indigenous peoples are more likely to be connected to the research and its results and derive benefit from it into the future.  Adding the Notice, as a first step, opens the space for those rights and interests to be clarified and expanded on by Indigenous communities over time.

HOW DOES A COMMUNITY KNOW IF A NOTICE HAS BEEN ADDED TO A COLLECTION, SAMPLE or DATA?

The Notices are generated in the Local Contexts Hub. When a Notice is generated, a notification can be sent directly to the relevant community. If they are also users of the Local Contexts Hub this can be done automatically. If not, an email notification can be sent to the relevant community or the notification sits in the Hub until the relevant community connects to the Hub.

COULD I USE A TK OR BC NOTICE IN A PUBLICATION?

Yes. The Notices were developed to make visible existing Indigenous rights and interests that derive from research contexts. Increasingly publishers are supporting greater transparency and integrity in research, and the Notices help do this. If you are interested in using a Notice for a publication, please contact the Local Contexts team (link).

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN THE NOTICES AND THE LABELS?

The Notices were developed for researchers and institutions to identify Indigenous rights and interests. The Notices are not customizable. 

The Labels are an intervention for Indigenous communities and local organizations to clarify their rights and express more precisely the nature of their relationship to the collection or data. Overtime, community generated TK or BC Labels will replace Notices within digital systems.

AS AN INDIGENOUS RESEARCHER, CAN I USE NOTICES AND LABELS?

Yes. You can add a Notice at any time during your research. You may also develop Labels for your community working with the appropriate community authority/ies.

HOW DO THE NOTICES OPERATIONALIZE THE CARE PRINCIPLES?

The Notices operationalize the CARE Principles for the Governance of Indigenous Peoples Data (link). Specifically, they help researchers and institutions make clear and visible Indigenous rights as a standard research responsibility. By connecting Indigenous peoples to research conducted on Indigenous lands and waters, the Notices also increase capacity for Indigenous peoples to derive collective benefit from this research. The Notices support the application of Labels which reflect Indigenous ethics and protocols of engagement, collaboration and partnership.

IS THERE A RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE NOTICES AND THE FAIR PRINCIPLES?

Historical Indigenous collections are extremely difficult to find because they are mis-labelled, mis-attributed or have missing information. This makes ongoing connection to collections by Indigenous peoples and communities a very slow and labor-intensive process. The Notices will help make Indigenous collections and data Findable and Accessible in the future. The Notices will help make Indigenous collections and data FAIR.

ARE THERE ADDITIONAL RESOURCES I CAN USE?

Yes. Additional resources on Copyright,  Intellectual Property Law, Agreements, Protocols and MOUs can be found at ENRICH. Here you will also find training modules on Collaborative Curation, Cultural Awareness, Indigenous Intellectual and Cultural Property, Indigenous Data Sovereignty, CARE Principles, TK & BC Labels and Notices and Agreement Making.