TK Labels

Listen Example

TK Open to Collaboration (TK CB)

Why Use This Label?

This Label is being used to indicate that the community is open to research collaborations. With this Label, future opportunities for collaboration and engagement are supported.

TK Label Template Text

This Label is being used to make clear [community name or authorizing body] is open to future engagement, collaboration, and partnership around research opportunities.

Click on a TK Label below to learn more about its usage.

Haz click en las Etiquetas de CT a continuación para aprender más acerca de su uso.

Questions?

The TK Labels offer an educative and informational strategy to help non-community users of this cultural heritage understand its significance to the communities from where it derives and continues to have meaning. TK Labels identify cultural material that has community-specific conditions regarding access and use. The TK Labels promote new standards of respect by embedding Indigenous rules and protocols within digital systems. 

How long does it take to develop TK Labels?

The community customization of the TK Labels is a collaborative process. How long it takes will depend on the scope of the project and how many TK Labels you’d like to develop. The Local Contexts Hub facilitates the process and allows for community vetting and authorizations.  

DO I NEED PERMISSION TO USE THE TK LABELS?

Using the TK Labels does not require permission. You will need to register on the Local Contexts Hub to customize the TK Labels and deliver them to institutional contexts or data repositories.  Reach out to the Local Contexts team to get the process started.

CAN THE TK AND BC LABELS BE USED TOGETHER?

Yes. The TK and BC Labels were designed to be used separately and/or together. 

Listen to a community perspective on using the TK labels

James Francis, Sr. of the Penobscot Nation speaks about implementing the TK Labels in his community.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GOs-ieJ9iAo

The Passamaquoddy Experience using the Labels at the Library of Congress – Donald Soctomah, Passamaquoddy Tribe.

Watch video here.

ARE THERE ADDITIONAL RESOURCES I CAN USE?

Yes. Additional resources on Copyright,  Intellectual Property Law, Agreements, Protocols and MOUs can be found at ENRICH. Here you will also find training modules on Collaborative Curation, Cultural Awareness, Indigenous Intellectual and Cultural Property, Indigenous Data Sovereignty, CARE Principles, TK & BC Labels and Notices and Agreement Making.